MEDIAWORKS 2019: PHOTOJOURNALISM TEAM

Journalism Team’s field trip to The Richard Eaton Broadcast Center at the University of Maryland, home to UMTV and the Maryland Capital News Service (CNS) Broadcast Bureau. From left to right: Otto, Justice, Katia, Justin, and Sonia.

Journalism Team’s field trip to The Richard Eaton Broadcast Center at the University of Maryland, home to UMTV and the Maryland Capital News Service (CNS) Broadcast Bureau. From left to right: Otto, Justice, Katia, Justin, and Sonia.

MediaWorks Journalism Team, led by Emma Bergman, worked with the Capital News Service at University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism, to write five blog posts and create a photojournalism package about climate change, environmental racism, and health. This summer collaboration was a continuation of partnership that started in the 2018-2019 academic year.

See excerpts and links to published blogs below, and stay tuned to Wide Angle’s social media channels for links to the next round of published posts later this month!

 

Blog Posts

 
  1. Kids Will Do Anything to Cool Off by Justice Georgie

    Lieutenant Jimmy Artis of the Baltimore County Fire Department agrees that kids need places to cool off. "There is an outreach to the community,” he said, "because where are people going to go? We understand it is hot and playing with fire hydrants is an outlet they can use to cool off.” But it is important to remember that not all fire departments feel the same way. "Most cities might not understand the lengths kids are willing to go to because they’re not from the hood and may not know what struggle is,” Artis said. 

  2. Summer Heat in ‘94 by Otto Blais-Nelson

    "I didn’t sleep very well most nights, and it affected my ability to function during the day. I didn’t have a car, so I walked to work. One day I was so out of it that I stepped off the curb to cross the street without looking and came within inches of getting hit by a speeding car,” Nelson said.

  3. Living and Working in the Heat, A Youth Perspective by Katia Crawford

    High temperatures in urban centers like Baltimore City affect residents in negative ways. Dominant narratives about heat inequity center stories of people in poor communities, adults who pay bills, and the elderly. While these are valid perspectives, youth voices should be heard as well. I interviewed several high school students to get their opinions on how heat conditions affect them in school, at home, and in their communities.

  4. Hotheaded by Justin Marine

    We have to find a way to cool off the city. If we don’t, climate change will continue to worsen and it’s just going to get hotter. It is clear that rising temperatures will continue to result in increased violent crime. Global warming is real and it is affecting our world and lives in ways we don’t always see.

  5. Sickening Heat by Sonia Hug

    In 2018, Maryland suffered 28 heat-related deaths following 11 Code Red Extreme Heat days. Half of these occurred in Baltimore City, where many people live without air conditioning or an alternative way to cool off. Exposure to this extreme heat especially poses a danger to children, elders, and those with chronic medical illnesses.

 

Photojournalism Package: 55 Captioned Images

Here is a sample of the final package. (Select the image or select the right and left arrow keys to scroll through the images.)

McElderry Park Landscapes

 

People We Met

 

Amazing Grace Church

 

No Shoot Zone

 

Attempts to Stay Cool

 

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MEET THE AUTHOR

Hannah Shaw is the Communications Assistant at WAYM. She is a multidisciplinary designer and received her BS in Marketing from UMD and MA in Social Design from MICA.

 
Wide Angle Youth Media